Touchstone Book Wish List
 

 

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Touchstone Book Wish-List

Books, especially picture books, are the best source of  examples when developing curriculum for writing.  Many mini lessons can be garnered from text... the authors become Co-Teachers!  The books listed below are "Touchstone Texts," and provide clear and masterful examples of different types and styles of writing . 

Books don't need to be new to be precious, so if you have or find a used copy, we'll gladly accept it! 

Thank you for any books that you can provide. Remember, all donated items are tax deductible . 

Each Book Will Be Celebrated

A Bookplate will be permanently affixed to the inside cover acknowledging the gift. The child of the donating family will be offered the opportunity of presenting the book to the class,  and asked to select a favorite passage to read to the class.

 


Please Read the following example of how text can be used to teach and recognize concepts:

Curriculum statement:

A simile is made striking when the two things compared are very, very different---except for one quality they share (which drives the simile).

Book that provides text examples:

Gentle Giant Octopus .  1998.  Karen Wallace.  Illus. by Mike Bostock

Text example:

"Then [a Wolf eel] sinks like a nightmare deep into his den."


Listed below are 72 touchstone books.  I've included curriculum statements (taken from Katie Wood Ray's book What You Know By Heart) to help qualify their purchase. If more than one text example is listed, choose your favorite to donate! Our 2006-07 Goal:  ONE BOOK FOR EACH OF THE 19 CURRICULUM STATEMENTS.
If the book has been donated, the small silhouette next to the description will be removed.  Thank you, from all of us in Room 32 on this HUGE endeavor.

Curriculum statement:

A text can be written as a collection of short narrative pieces about a place, time, event, or topic.  Each narrative piece can stand alone.

Books that provide text examples:

In My Momma's Kitchen.  1999. Jerdine Nolen. Illus. by Colin Bootman

Tall Tales:  Six Amazing Basketball Dreams. 2000.  Charles R. Smith


Curriculum statement:

The narrator of a text can be an inanimate object.

Books that provide text examples:

Barn.  1996. Debbie Atwell

Cave.  2000.  Diane Siebert.  Illus. by Wayne McLoughlin

If a Bus Could Talk:  The Story of Rosa Parks.  1999. Raith Ringgold


Curriculum statement:

A text can be written as an accompaniment to an album of photos.

Books that provide text examples:

Looking Back.  1998. Lois Lowry


Curriculum statement:

A text can be written as a series of letters.

Books that provide text examples:

Around the World/Who's Been There?   19999. Lindsay Barret George

The Magpie Song.  1995. Laurence Anholt. Illus. by Dan Williams


Curriculum statement:

A piece of writing can be introduced with a collage of quates (on the topic of the writing) from different people.

Books that provide text examples:

Last Licks:  A Spaldeen Story.   Carrie Best.  Illus. by Diane Palmisciano.


Curriculum statement:

A text can be written with a series of different narrators.

Books that provide text examples:

Voices fo the Alamo.   2000. Sherry Garland. Illus. by Ronald Himler


Curriculum statement:

A text can be written entirely as a conversation.

Books that provide text examples:

Momma, Where Are you From?    2000. Marie Bradby. Illus. by Chris K Soentpiet.

Now What Can I Do?   2001.  Margaret Park.  Illus. by Melissa Sweet

One More Time, Moma.  1999.  Sue Alexander.  Illus. by David Soman

Ring!  Yo?   2000. Chris Raschka


Curriculum statement:

The main body of a text (story, description, essay, etc.) can have fats embedded around it.

Books that provide text examples:

Bat Loves the Night.   2001. Nicola Davies. Illus. by Sarah Fox-Davies

Cook-a-Doodle-Doo!  1999. Janet Stevens and Susan Stevens Crummel.  Illus. by Janet Stevens.

Gentle Giant Octopus.   1998.Karen Wallace.  Illus. by Mike Bostock

Sacred Places.   2000. Philemon Sturges.  Illus. by Giles Laroche

Supermarket. 2001  Kathleen Krull.  Illus. by Melanie Hope Greenberg


Curriculum statement:

A text might be a collection of poems that tells about a topic or tells a story.  If the poems tell a story, they are written as a series that moves through time.

Books that provide text examples:

All by Herself.  1999.  Ann Whitford Paul.  Illus. by Michael Steirnagle

Amber Was Brave, Essie Was Smart.   2001.  Vera B. Williams.

From the Bellybutton of the Moon/Del Ombligo de la Luna.   1998.  Francisco X. Alarcon. Illus. by Maya Christina Gonzales.

Learning to Swim.  2000.  Ann Turner. (memoir) .  

Love That Dog.   2001.  Sharon Creech.  (novel)

My Man Blue.  1999.  Nikki Grimes.  Illus. by Jerome Lagarrigue.

The Other Side.   1998.  Angela Johnson. (memoir)

River Friendly/River Wild.   Jane Kurtz.  Illus. by Neil Brennan.

Stepping Out with Granda Mac.  2001 . Nikki Grimes. Illus. by Angelo.


Curriculum statement:

A text can communicate your message when it's written to look like a kind of text readers don't normally read for pleasure or recreation.

Books that provide text examples:

Everything I Know About Pirates.   2000.  Tom Lichtenheld.  (written like a reference book-- but obviously made up of funny bogus facts)

The Secret Knowledge of Grown-Ups:  The Second File.   2001. David Wisniewski.


Curriculum statement:

A text (or part of a text) can use a repeated phrase as a transitional device at the end of sections of text vignettes, descriptions, or ideas.

Books that provide text examples:

Gifts.  1997. Phyllis Limbacher Tildes.

Grandpa Never Lies.  2000.  Ralph Fletcher. Illus. by Harvey Stevenson.

Making the World.   1998.  Douglas Wood. Illus. by Yoshi and Hibiki Miyazaki

Mothers Are Like That.   2000.  Carol Carrick.  Illus. by Paul Carrick.

On the Same Day in March:  A Tour of the World's Weather.   2000.  Marilyn Singer.  Illus. by Frane Lessac.

What a Wonderful Day to Be a Cow.   1995.  Carolyn Lesser.  Illus. by Melissa Bay Mathis.


Curriculum statement:

A text (or part of a text) can use a repeated phrase as a transitional device at the beginning of new sections of text vignettes, desciptions or ideas.

Books that provide text examples:

A Gift from the Sea.   2001. Kate Banks.  Illus. by Georg Hallensleben.

I Loved You Even Before You Were Born.   2001.  Anne Bowen. Illus. by Greg Shed.

This Is the Tree.   2000.  Mirian Moss.  Illus. by Adrienne Kennaway.

Up North at the Cabin.   1992.  Marsha Wilson Chall. Illus. by Steve Johnson.

When I Am Old with You.   1990.  Angela Johnson.  Illus. by Daid Soman

When Spring Comes.   1993.  Natalie Kinsey-Warnock.  Illus. by Stacey Schuett.


Curriculum statement:

A text (or part of a text) can take a single person, place, thing, or idea and describe it in different ways.

Books that provide text examples:

My Dad.   2000. Anthony Brown.

Uptown.  2000. Bryan Collier.

Water.  1995.  Frank Asch


Curriculum statement:

The ending of a text can thread back through details mentioned previously in the text.

Books that provide text examples:

If You Find a Rock .  Peggy Christian.  Illus. by Barbara Hirsch Lember.

If You Were Born a Kitten.  1997.  Marion Dane Bauer.  Illus. by JoEllen McAllister Stammen.

Making the World.   1998.  Douglas Wood.  Illus. by Yoshi and Hibiki Miyazaki.

Off We Go!   2000.  Jane Yolen.  Illus. by Laurel Molk.


Curriculum statement:

A text (or part of a text) can take a single idea and look at it comparatively across many different times, settings, or characters or creatures.

Books that provide text examples:

Animal Dads.   1997.  Sneed B. Collard III.  Illus. by Steve Jenkins.

Birdsong.  1997.  Audrey Wood.  Illus. by Robert Florczak.   Diane Siebert.  Illus. by Wayne McLoughlin.

Castles, Caves, and Honeycombs.   2001.  Linda Ashman.  Illus. by Lauren Stringer.

Grandad's Prayers of the Earth.  1999. Douglas Wood.  Illus. by P.J. Lynch.

Market.  1996.  Ted Lewin.

Throw You Tooth on the Roof.    1998.  Selby B. Beeler.  Illus. by G. Brian Karas.

When It Starts to Snow.   1998.  Phillis Gershator.  Illus. by Martin Matje.


Curriculum statement:

A text (or part of a text) can by organized to follow some natural time pattern in the world -- seasons, months, weeks, days, hour, minutes.

Books that provide text examples:

Cloud Dance.   1000. Thomas Locker.

Everett Anderson's Christmas Coming.    1991,  LucileClifton.  Illus. by Jan Spivey Gilchrist.

January Rides the Wind.   1997.  Charlotte F. Otten.  Illus. by Todd L.W. Doney.

Ma Dear's Aprons.   1997.  Patricia C. McKissack.  Illus. by Floyd Cooper.

Mice and Beans.   2001.  Pam Munoz Ryan.  Illus. by Joe Cepeda.

Night City.   1998.  Monica Wellington.

Park Beat.  2001.  Jonathan London.  Illus. by Woodleigh Marx Hubbard.

Pieces: A Year in Poems and Quilts.  2001.  Anna Gossnickle Hines.

The Web Files.  2001.  Margie Palatini. Illus. by Richard Egielski.

When the Earth Wakes.   1998.  Ani Rucki.


Curriculum statement:

A text ( or part of a text) can set up an idea and then simply list out examples that support the idea.

Books that provide text examples:

Hoops.  1997.  Robert Burleigh.  Illus. by Stephen T. Johnson.

Jessie's Island .  1992.  Sheryl McFarlane.  Illus. by Sheena Lott.

Tulip Sees America.  1998.  Cynthia Rylant.  Illus. by Lisa Desimini


Curriculum statement:

A text (or part of a text) can by organized to follow the natural course of something in nature--a storm, a river, the budding of a flower, etc.

Books that provide text examples:

River Story.   2000.  Meredith Hooper.  Illus. by Bee Willey.

Storm on the Desert.   1997.  Carolyn Lesser.  Illus. by Ted Rand.


Curriculum statement:

A text (or part of a text) can be organized as a series of different questions and answers.

Books that provide text examples:

Do You Know What I'll Do?   2000.  Charlotte Zolotow.  Illus. by Javaka Steptoe.

Have You Ever Done That?  2001. Julie Larios.  Illus. by Anne Hunter.